Tuesday, October 14, 2008

River Valley Fencing


This past summer, Johnny's had a fence installed by River Valley Fencing. As Brian has mentioned in his "What's New at the Farm?" updates, we had a severe deer problem, and needed a solution. This fence seems to have done the trick!


Fence details:
  • It took twenty days to build the 8’ high, high tensile fence with fixed knot, black woven wire with 12’ posts of 6” diameter placed every 20’.

  • The wire is specifically designed for commercial vegetable and orchard operations. The bottom squares of the fence wire allow for biodiversity, helping to keep the mice and small vermin population down by allowing small predators through the fence.

  • There are 4 main gates, 24’ wide, and 9 smaller gateways. Gates are 98” high and have a 4”x4” welded galvanized mesh. There are a variety of gate widths based on Johnny’s access needs.

  • Posts were installed using a post pounder that has a rock spike because the ground conditions were especially hard. Although usually able to pound an average of 50 posts per day, we averaged only 30 per day at Johnny’s. The post pounding was the hardest that RVF has encountered all season.

  • Approximately 70 16’ H-Brace assemblies were installed whenever the fence changed direction or there was a gateway. These are required because the wire is stretched at high tension.

  • A 10,000 lb. tracked skid steer with a hydraulic wire stretcher was used to unwind the wire and to tighten the fence to the correct tension. The stretcher allows us to ‘tension’ up to a 1000 continuous feet, and to install up to 4000’ of wire in a day, depending on terrain.

  • All fence materials are designed for agricultural use and have a life expectancy of at least 30 years, with the wire lasting up to 40 years.

River Valley Fencing specializes in fences that are functional and beautiful. Using the finest materials, and the best suited to the client’s needs, this team of experienced fencers will build the fence that protects livestock or crops and beautifies the landscape. No job is too small or too large for River Valley Fencing.


Daniel Maltby, President and owner of River Valley Fencing has been farming for over 20 years and fencing since 1997. He will consults by phone and in person to assess the client’s fence needs. Following a visit, he will provides a written plan, with duration of the work and a cost estimate for the project. When the client is ready, Daniel will schedule the job, have materials delivered, and arrive with his fencing team to efficiently complete the project. Daniel is fully experienced in USDA Equip program grants and has completed many different jobs under NRCS specifications in all New England states.



Surveying for the fence


Setting preliminary posts


Eyeballing the fence post alignment


Carrying posts


Laying out posts


Setting posts in rocky Maine soil


Adding cross posts for stability


Strengthening the fence


Stretching the wire


Stretching more wire


Attaching the wire


Adjusting the wire


More attachments




5 comments:

Scott Supak said...

I have fence envy.

We're just renting, so we're not going to build something that nice, but I guess we're going to have to do something next spring. The deer just like the peas we ordered from you back in August too much. Liquid fence works for a while, and pepper spray helps, but it all washes away in the rain, and it's too expensive to keep reapplying every time.

We're really happy with the plants, BTW. Great spinach and collards. We can't wait to order from you in the spring!

Hope you can check out my old organic gardening site, which I'm happy to be finally working on again.

http://supak.com

Thanks again.

the webmaster at Johnny's Selected Seeds said...

An anonymous blogger left this advice regarding deer on an earlier article. It might help you with your deer problem.

"The best way to keep deer out of the the garden is to not plant one. The second best way to keep deer out of the garden is to put a few fence posts around the garden. Then take a piece of strong string and encircle the garden using the fence posts a support. Try to not tie the string to posts. The string should be about two feet from the ground. Tie plastic grocery bags to the string every ten to twenty feet. As the deer step into the string the bags move. This bag movement is seen and heard by the deer and they leave. Sounds crazy, but it really does work."

The second best way sounds good, and would be a convenient way to reuse some of those plastic bags we all have taking up space somewhere in our homes.

Barring plastic bags, old t-shirt strips would probably work well, too, especially they weren't washed first.

I'm very glad that you are enjoying bounty from our seed! Please note that, if you order seed before 11/15, you can also enjoy our 2008 pricing.

Your website is great, too, thank you for sharing!

Anonymous said...

it would be nice to view the photos but apparently they are no longer linked

Palisade fencing said...

Superb ! Your blog is incredible. I am delighted with it. Thanks for sharing with me.

Faith mon said...

This blog is very helpful us.Thanks for sharing information about fence.
Seattle Fence Company